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Historic Baseball

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Hugh Alexander
Born: July 10, 1917 in Buffalo, Mo. 
Died: Nov. 25, 2000
Debut: 1937 | Pos: OF
Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 190 | B: R | T: R

Yrs G AB Hits HR RBI SB BA
1 7 11 1 0 0 1 .091

>> Visit the Hugh Alexander biography on Baseball Almanac for complete statistics.


Hugh Alexander, a major league scout for 61 years, died Nov. 25, 2000, at the age of 83.

His scouting career got its start in 1938 and he retired from the Cubs in 1998 as special player consultant.  He worked at spring training in Florida for 2 more years after that.

His career includes scouting for Cleveland (14 years), Chicago White Sox (5 years), Los Angeles Dodgers (15 years), and the Phillies (16 years). 

As a high school student, in 1935, Alexander qualified for the Olympic trials as a sprinter.  The Cleveland Indians signed him when he finished the 11th grade.

He made it to the Major Leagues in 2 years, playing in 7 games for the Indians in 1937.  However, while working on an Oklahoma oil well in 1937, his left hand was severed. He became a scout for the Indians a year later.  

In a Gannett News Service article, he was asked about today’s players and the many that he had seen over the years.

“I thought Babe Ruth, back when I saw him play years ago, had the best swing of anybody in baseball,” Alexander was quoted as saying. “And who’s got one almost identical? Griffey. He’s got a swing almost like Babe Ruth. A good swing’s a good swing.”

Alexander was memorialized in “Dollar Sign on the Muscle,” a book on scouting written by Kevin Kerrane.  In that book, Alexander talked about “biggest mistake” — not signing Mickey Mantle.

A column by Jerome Holtzman tells the story of Alexander making it to Commerce High School, but he was told by some there that Mantle had been injured and had arthritis in his leg.  Alexander left the school without ever talking to Mantle.

Alexander was memorialized in “Dollar Sign on the Muscle,” a book on scouting written by Kevin Kerrane.  In that book, Alexander talked about “biggest mistake” — not signing Mickey Mantle.

The story says that Alexander made it to Commerce High School, but was told by some there that Mantle had been injured and had arthritis in his leg.  Alexander left the school without ever talking to Mantle.

In 1993, he was named Scout of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America Foundation. 

Sources: Associated Press, Gannett News Service, Jerome Holtzman Archive