Historic Baseball

Historic Baseball

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Dan Driessen

Daniel Driessen
Born: July 29, 1951 in Hilton Head Island, S.C.
Debut: 1973 | Pos: 1B
H: 5’11” | W: 190 | B: L | T: R

Yr G AB R H HR RBI SB BA
15 1732 5479 746 1464 153 763 154 .267

>> Visit the Dan Driessen biography on Baseball Almanac for complete statistics.


Dan Driessen arrived in the National League in the shadow of Cincinnati’s Big Red Machine. However, he would establish himself at first base for the Reds and bring about the trade of one of the Big Red Machine’s big members.

Driessen debuted in 1973 and hit .301 with 4 HR and 47 RBI in his frist season. From 1974 to 1976, he hit 7 HR in each season and established himself as a versatile player for the Reds.

In fact, the Reds thought so highly of Driessen’s ability that they traded away future Hall of Famer Tony Perez to open the first base position in 1977. That season proved to be Driessen’s most productive in the majors. He hit .300 with 17 HR, 91 RBIs and added 31 stolen bases.

His fielding was also good enough to lead the National League three times and he held the Reds’ first base position for one of the longest stretches in team history. In 1979, he had his career high with 18 home runs. A year later, Driessen, a patient hitter, led the NL in walks with 93.

In 1984, he ended up in Montreal following a mid-season trade. Between the Reds and the Expos that season, he hit 16 HR and collected 60 RBI. From 1985 until 1986, he played with the San Francisco Giants. Late in 1986, he appeared in 17 games with Houston.

His career ended with St. Louis in 1987. He hit a home run that season and drove in 11 runs. However, he gained an increased role in the offense when starter Jack Clark was injured. The injury gave Driessen the opportunity to step in and play in the National League Championship Series. He picked up three hits in 12 at-bats and drove in a run. In the Cardinals’ 4-3 World Series loss to Minnesota, Driessen had three hits in 13 at-bats and drove in a run.

He retired following that season. The South Carolina native is also the uncle of former Major Leaguer Gerald Perry.