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 History Players Teams Obituaries Site search Contact UsSponsor a page on Historic Baseball! Click here for detailsNorm McMillan Norman Alexis McMillanNickname: Bub Born: October 5, 1895 in Latta, S.C.  Died: September 28, 1968 in Marion, S.C.Debut: 1922 | Pos: 3B Ht: 6’0″ | Wt: 175 | B: R | T: R YrsGABRHHR RBISBBA54131356157353614736.260>> Visit the Norm McMillan biography on Baseball Almanac for complete statistics.Norm McMillan, born in Latta, S.C., played for parts of five seasons in the major leagues as a utility player. His most productive season came in 1929 with the Chicago Cubs when he hit .271 in 459 at-bats with 5 home runs and 55 runs batted in. He also had 13 stolen bases.He spent his career with a number of teams and was involved in a trade on Jan. 30, 1923, that sent Pitcher Herb Pennock from the Boston Red Sox to New York for McMillan, pitcher George Murray , outfielder Camp Skinner and $10,000.McMillan was also involved in one of the stranger plays in baseball history. On Aug. 26, 1929, the Cubs and Reds were tied at 5-5 in the bottom of the eighth inning of a game at Wrigley Field. McMillan came to bat with the bases loaded and hit a line drive down the left field side. The Reds leftfielder Evar Swanson was shaded toward centerfield and he couldn’t find the ball.  Four runs score on the play and the Cubs win. After the game, Cubs relief pitcher Ken Penner picked up his jacket in the bullpen after the game and found the missing ball in his right sleeve. According to an account in the Chicago Tribune on Aug. 29, 1929, “McMillan drove the ball just inside third base. It was a double in any league. Swanson chased over to pick the ball out of the gutter near the Cub bullpen but was surprised to discover the object of his visit had vanished.”While the search for the ball continued, McMillan crossed the plate for the seventh run of the inning and an inside-the-park grand slam.Another newspaper account disputes that the ball bounced into the bullpen.  According to the Associated Press account of the day, the ball, which would have been a single, bounced into the stands. Chicago Daily Tribune (Aug. 27, 1929, p. 21)Following his career in baseball, McMillan owned and ran a drug store in Latta and lived on a farm near there.Sources: Baseball Almanac, Baseball Online Library, Chicago Tribune (Aug. 29, 1929, p. 21), Associated Press (Aug. 29, 1929).